Trump Administration Might Deport Another Batch to Mauritania

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Mauritania a Muslim-majority nation located in Northwest Africa and is considered to be the eleventh largest sovereign state in Africa. Reportedly, Mauritania is a country known for human trafficking and slavery of its black residents to the point of torture and even death.

Racism raised to slavery against black residents in this country have ended in 1905 by the French colonial administration but have failed in some parts of the country which then has become part of its culture.

In the years 2014 to 2017, there were reportedly only seven deportations to Mauritania yearly. But in 2018, numbers have changed. There were already 79 people who were sent back to Mauritania, and according to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE, there are still 22 who are in the waiting list for deportation.

Last week, Trump’s statement about this problem was that he and his administration is committed to solving this issue. He said,

“My administration is committed to leveraging every resource we have to confront this threat, to support the victims and the survivors, and to hold traffickers accountable for their heinous crimes.”

In his vow to end criminal organizations that lead in human trafficking, drugs, and people who illegally cross borders, he referred their acts as ‘evil’ and their beings as ‘monsters.’ But things have escalated quickly. This week, President Trump’s administration is likely to deport four black men to Mauritania. This could mean an end to their rights and freedom as human beings since slavery in Mauritania is still an ongoing part of their everyday lives. We may feel sorry for these men, but this is the reality — they might be sent back to the hands of torturers.

The numbers of people sent back to their land have gone higher, and it’s sad to know that there are families who are just a step away from slavery only because a decision has to be made. This practice of slavery has been out of control for years now. It has been a hereditary fear for the people affected and a norm of being afflicted. We can only hope that there will be no more deportations to this country and find useful and legal ways to end slavery of black residents in Mauritania.

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