Microsoft frustrated at U.S. lawmakers’ tight lip over Huawei ban

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Microsoft President Brad Smith, in a recent interview with Bloomberg, has expressed his frustration over the U.S Government and Trump’s administration. This is due to the utter lack of detail provided to them by the administration, over the supposed evidence leading to the Huawei ban.

According to his statements, when the U.S. lawmakers were asked to explain why exactly Huawei “posed a threat to national security”, he was usually met with counter-statements that were “too vague”. The general response was to simply tell that Microsoft would be in agreement with the U.S. Government if the details were revealed, even though officials are adamant at not providing that specific inquired detail about the incident.

The reason why Microsoft seemed quite distressed at the recent Huawei ban, was that the Chinese company was one of its biggest customers. Almost all laptop models developed by Huawei come pre-installed with Windows. However, with the recent ban, Microsoft is unable to keep licensing the OS to the company, which in turn results in losing a significant portion of the potential revenue of its (primary) operating system business.

To recap the recent events, the Trump administration has added Huawei to its blacklist last May after an executive order was released. The main reason for the Huawei ban was security concerns over the alleged connections that the tech giant has with the Chinese government.

This event caused a significant disturbance to the mobile tech community, as Huawei was one of the leading distributors of OEM computers and devices around the world. Huawei, in turn, had its business operations significantly halted, losing its OS licensing to U.S. companies, particularly Android and Windows.

Even earlier, the U.S. government has also banned American companies from using Huawei-manufactured networking equipment, based on similar concerns as early as 2012. Though the committee was steadfast at its assessment that the companies were not “forthcoming enough”, lawmakers were equally reluctant to present the alleged evidence to the public, much like Microsoft’s recent experience.

At the moment, at least according to the interview, Smith’s primary concern is that this might just be the beginning, that this might simply be the first among tighter and tighter security measures that would ultimately limit the development of (consumer) technology across the world.

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