Rocket Lab postponed Electron launch

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Rocket Lab, a commercial space company, postponed the launch of one of its Electron rockets due to unfavorable weather conditions but is set to place another launch within the next few days. 

According to the Huntington Beach, California-based company, the launch of an Electron rocket was postponed due to high winds at their New Zealand launch site on Friday, August 16.

Rocket Lab initially hoped to launch the Electron’s mission, called “Look Ma, No Hands” from the Māhia Peninsula during a 100-minute window that opened at 8:57 a.m. EDT if ground winds were not too strong. 

“We are standing down from today’s launch attempt due to weather. Surface level winds are 30% over limit,” Rocket Lab representatives wrote in a Twitter update. “We have plenty of back up opportunities in the coming days though. A new target launch day/time will be advised soon.”

If the launch took place and with mother nature’s forgiving weather, Rocket Lab’s Electron rocket would have carried four small satellite launch segments called CubeSats.

Rocket Lab, which was founded back in 2006, offers commercial flights into space via payload delivery such as satellite launches for private companies, which Rocket Lab markets at $5 million per flight. Its Electron rocket has already delivered satellites into space for paying clients. Electron’s latest payload includes CubeSat satellite deliveries for UnseenLabs, Blacksky Global-4, and the US Air Force Space Command. 

French company UnseenLabs asked Rocket Lab to install an ocean-monitoring CubeSat, which aims to build a network of “maritime surveillance” satellites for their customers.

Meanwhile, another Earth-imaging satellite was upon the request of Seattle-based BlackSky Global-4, which aims to add a CubeSat to their growing satellite network.

The final two CubeSats are prototypes built for the U.S. Air Force Space Command to test new technologies in orbit. 

They will serve as an “on-orbit testbed for emerging technologies in 2019,” Air Force officials said in a statement.  The launch of the BlackSky satellite and Air Force CubeSats were arranged by the space rideshare company Spaceflight.

“The demonstration will test new technologies including propulsion, power, communications and drag capabilities for potential applications on future spacecraft,” Air Force officials said. The two satellites were built by Tiger Innovations Inc. in Herndon, Virginia and should last about a year in orbit.

Now, Rocket Lab is targeting another launch date on Monday (August 19) at 8:12 a.m. EDT (1212 GMT). The company has a 14-day window to launch the mission.

If the August 19 launch becomes successful, it will mark the eighth flight of a Rocket Lab Electron in total. 

Specifically, Electron is a two-stage orbital expendable launch vehicle, with an optional third stage that is developed to cover the commercial CubeSats satellites. Its Rutherford engines, manufactured in California, are the first electric-pump-fed engine to power an orbital rocket.

An electric-pump-fed engine is a bipropellant rocket engine in which the fuel pumps are electrically powered, and so all of the input propellants is directly burned in the main combustion chamber, and none is diverted to drive the pumps. This differs from traditional rocket engine designs, in which the pumps are driven by a portion of the input propellants.

Furthermore, the booster is a 57-foot tall (15 meters) spacecraft that is designed to launch small satellites into low-Earth orbit. The rocket can carry payloads of up 500 lbs. (227 kilograms), and can haul multiple CubeSats at a time. 

Rocket Lab first deployed its rocket in May of 2017, which reached space but was not able to reach orbit due to a glitch in the communication equipment on the ground. On its second orbit-reaching flight on January 2018, the company was also able to deploy three of its first CubeSats in space.

The company, later on, launched commercial flights for other companies and institutions in November 2018.

Unlike SpaceX, another commercial space flight provider, Rocket Lab doesn’t currently recover and reuse its rockets. However, the company wants to change this and be able to reuse rockets for more efficient and affordable options.

The company recently announced a reusability roadmap for its Electron launch vehicles, which includes a mid-air recovery effort that will see a helicopter snag the first stage of the Electron rocket as a mid-air retrieval method, saving it from damage and allowing engineers to refurbish it for future launches.

You can watch the launch directly from Rocket Lab’s live stream website. The webcast will begin about 15 minutes before launch time. 

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