‘Mahmee’ is a startup that wants to help new mothers through an app

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Mahmee aims to help new mothers to safeguard their health through an app that connects them to healthcare services and other resources to help women — especially women of color — prevent post emotional and physical health complications.

Founded in 2014, Mahmee is a HIPAA-secure care management platform that makes it easy for payers, providers, and patients to coordinate comprehensive prenatal and postpartum healthcare from anywhere.

The United States is one of the countries with the worst rate of maternal deaths in the developed world, where thousands of women, especially women of color, experience pregnancy-related complications just before or in the year after childbirth. The annual maternity-related death in the U.S. reaches 700 deaths every year, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

This is the reason why Melissa Hanna, CEO of Mahmee and a co-founder, along with her mother, Linda Hanna, put up the business in order to health women to get better access to postpartum and prenatal healthcare. Linda Hanna has been a long-time nurse and lactation consultant, making her see the reality of maternal health in the country – which contributed to their drive to put up their business.

“We believe that comprehensive maternal healthcare is ongoing education and support that addresses the unique intersection of the physical and emotional aspects of pregnancy, postpartum and parenthood, as each individual experiences them,” reads the website of Mahmee.

The service the startup is offering includes an app that connects new mothers to doctors, health care professionals, and motherhood experts. Mothers can sign up on their own and get access to a team of experts, including maternity coaches, nutritionists, and lactation coaches. If their healthcare professional also has an account in the app, the patient and the healthcare professional can share information with each other through the app.

In 2019, the app already has more than 1,000 providers and organizations in its network. In July, the app received $3 million in new funding to grow its team. A huge portion of the new funding comes from the tennis superstar, Serena Williams, who last year shared her horrifying near-death experience after she gave birth to her daughter.

“The idea for Mahmee came about from watching my mom work in this field for years and years and realizing that there was a limited set of tools available to professionals like herself to create the impact that she wanted to have on mothers’ and babies’ lives,” said Melissa Hanna, CEO of Mahmee.

“And after watching her build out very successful programs for hospitals and health systems and all sorts of different experiences in the inpatient setting, we started talking about what could be done in the outpatient setting when patients are home with their families,” she added.

Melissa said in an interview that through the years, Mahmee has been helping new mothers who are experiencing prenatal anxiety and supporting them in preparing for their childbirth experience in the hospital. Some of those that they have helped experience postpartum bleeding and depression.

“In the past 12 months, we’ve had patients who’ve experienced severe blood loss and postpartum hemorrhaging. We’ve worked with families and with mothers that are experiencing prenatal anxiety and supporting them in preparing for their childbirth experience in the hospital. There have been patients who have experienced postpartum depression; in some cases, some very severe postpartum psychosis symptoms,” she said.

Furthermore, Melissa echoed the problem and how black women are the most affected by it. She said that there is a discrepancy on how black mothers and infants are being taken care of in the hospital.

“What we’re seeing now is the crisis of maternity and infant health care come to the surface because the stats around black mother and black infant mortality and morbidity are so inexcusable. There’s a huge discrepancy in how patients are cared for,” she added.

Melissa said that Mahmee also practices what is called “culturally competent care,” where “from day one our team is getting trained on how to listen to families’ concerns actively, and specifically to read between the lines of the things that are being shared by new mothers.”

In the end, Melissa and her mom only hoped for a future where new mothers are safe and well taken care of – no matter what color their skin is. And they hope that Mahmee, as an app, can democratize access to necessary healthcare attention to every mother in the United States.

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