Twitter to hide unwanted messages with a new filter

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Twitter announced that they would be testing a new feature that would essentially protect people from receiving abusive and harassing messages through the microblogging platform’s Direct Messages feature.

Currently, messages on Twitter is open to everyone – meaning, everyone can send a message to anyone without even following them. The messages sent by the account with the matched following – or those that follow each other – will directly go to the Direct Messages panel and those coming from other users not followed (or not following) an account will go to the “Message Request” panel inside the Direct Message page.

The current system in Twitter’s messaging is designed for more ways to connect people together; however, this also invites all forms of messages, including abuse. The straightforward solution right now is for users to disable their Direct Message from people who don’t follow them and they don’t follow; however, this does not work for people, like journalists or doctors or businesses, to have their inbox open in case legitimate messages are sent their way.

This is the reason why Twitter is testing a new filter that would move unwanted, abusive, and harassing messages to a different tab in the Direct Messages panel.

“Unwanted messages aren’t fun. So we’re testing a filter in your DM requests to keep those out of sight, out of mind,” reads a post from Twitter’s support team’s account.

Now, instead of lumping messages in one view, Twitter is going to filter unwanted and spam messages so that users will not automatically see them. The Message Requests section will include the messages from people you don’t follow, and below that, you’ll find a way to access these newly filtered messages.

The new feature will have users to voluntarily click the “Show” button so that they can see and read filtered messages, which, according to Twitter, could include unwanted, harassing, and bullying messages.

And by showing filtered messages, users won’t automatically be able to read all messages as Twitter will also be hiding messages that they think could be abusive and harassing. Instead of a preview of the message, the user will be reading a warning that Twitter censored the specific message because they could possibly be harassing or abusive. That way, the user can decide whether to open the message or directly trash it using a delete button located on the right side of every message.

The change that Twitter is “testing” has the potential to make Direct Messages as a tool for people that needs their inbox open, and a move that will help stop the proliferation of online abuse and hate speech.

Similarly, Facebook has since had an option to filter messages that they felt were offensive. A similar process, where messages from people you are not friends with are clustered in the Filtered section in Messenger and those that appear to be offensive appears just below them.

And Twitter has been very clear that this feature is still on the “testing” phase, which puts into question the slow pace of Twitter in fighting abuse in their platform. Facebook Messenger has been filtering messages in this way since late 2017, and Twitter is still not launching this; they’re just “testing” it.

Hope is not totally left off of Twitter as the social media giant has also been testing the idea of hiding problematic messages in their platform. Earlier this year, Twitter has started to roll out a feature in Canada that would let users “Hide Replies” so that everyone cannot see them. The hidden replies are not deleted but are just hidden behind other replies that require people to click something to read them.

The new message filtering system is just one of the new changes that Twitter is testing right now to improve the environment in their platform. Aside from the Hide Replies function, Twitter is also developing different ways for users to follow a specific topic, which the company announced earlier this week in a press conference. Additionally, Twitter will also launch a search tool for the Direct Message inbox so that users can easily access messages from specific users or topics, as well as support for iOS Live Photos as GIFs, the ability to reorder photos, and more.

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