‘A Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy’ Is Coming To Hulu

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Executive producers Carlton Cuse and Jason Fuchs are creating a TV series adaptation of A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy in Hulu.

Cuse, the producer of Lost and Jack Ryan, and Fuchs, the producer of I Still See You and It Chapter Two, will team up as the series’ executive producers, showrunners, and writers. Fuchs, also known for his screenwriting for Wonder Woman, will write the pilot.

The series will be a collaboration between ABC Studios and Disney, the parent company of Hulu. Cuse, who owns Genre Arts production company, will be leading the production for the TV series adaptation.

The TV series will be a modern update of the classic science fiction tale. However, there is no news yet if there will be any changes to the characters or the main storyline.

A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy focuses on the adventures of Arthur Dent, an Englishman who wanted to save his home from demolition, and Ford Prefect, an alien who is a contributor for the hitchhiking guide. Prefect saved Dent when intergalactic aliens demolished Earth.

Since then, Dent and Prefect were thrown into a big road trip across the universe. The duo meets Zaphod Beeblebrox and his companion Trillian and goes onboard The Heart of Gold, a ship powered by an Infinite Improbability Engine. A depressed robot named Marvin rounds out the unlikely group who travels to the legendary planet Magrathea for an exciting adventure.

Douglas Adams created the British series. It has been a significant part of British pop culture. The series has been adapted to different forms of entertainment; however, this is the first time it will be adapted into a TV series for the American audience.

The History of the Hitchhiker’s Guide

Adams created the A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy in 1978 as a science fiction comedy radio series. It was broadcasted in the UK on BBC Radio 4. The radio series was successful in bringing wit and comedy in an out-of-the-box format.

The design of the drama was experimental with the use of its new music and sound effects. Adams’ was inspired by Pink Floyd and the Beatles, and wanted a rock album feel for the radio series. A second series was commissioned in 1980.

After the success of the first series, Adams adapted his story into a novel in 1979. It was also adapted into a TV show. The sci-fi series created four more books.

The novels are titled as The Restaurant at the End of the Universe, Life, the Universe and Everything, So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish, and Mostly Harmless. A sixth novel installment, titled And Another Thing…, was written by Eion Colfer and released in 2009, eight years after Adams’ death.

Series’ Adaptations

The 1981 TV series focused on the first and second radio show adaptation. It starred Simon Jones as Arthur Dent and David Dixon as Ford Prefect. Mark Wing-Davey and Sandra Dickinson portrayed Zaphod Beeblebrox and Trillian. Marvin, the robot, was played by David Learner in a costume but was voiced by Stephen Moore. The show’s narrator was Peter Jones.

Aside from the TV series, the series was also adapted into a 1984 video game. The game was developed by Infocom and can be played on various platforms like Apple II, Atari ST, MS-DOS, and plenty more.

The most recent adaptation was the 2005 movie directed by Garth Jennings. It earned a $104.5 million with a budget of about $50 million. The reception was reasonably okay, but it wasn’t good enough to start a sequel.

Martin Freeman was perfect for the role of Arthur Dent. Freeman’s style of panicky and comedic acting worked well in personifying Dent. Mos Def (whose real name is Yasiin Bey) was Dent’s eccentric alien friend, Ford Prefect.

Sam Rockwell played Zaphod Beeblebrox with a second head under his neck. His relaxed and stylish demeanor perfectly portrays the character’s calm and adventurous side. When he asked about the charm of Zaphod, Rockwell said, “Zaphod’s very Bill Clinton, he’s a very charming guy. He has to be, that’s what it said in the book, so I had to pull it out of somewhere.”

Meanwhile, Zooey Deschanel was Trillian. Although Trillian’s love story was not one of the main plots in the novels, the romance was heavily laid down on the film. Deschanel said that she watched many movies as a reference for her love story scenes with Freeman and Rockwell.

Last but not least, Marvin the Robot was played by Warwick Davis. Stephen Fry also voiced the narrator for the film.

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