‘User Data Are Not Transferred To Russia,’ Says FaceApp

The popular photo-manipulation app, Face App, has taken social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by storm. And with “by storm,” it means that a lot of people, including celebrities and famous individuals, have jumped on the bandwagon to see how they would look like when they grow old.

There are a lot of things interesting about the app; it can manipulate a photo that a user submits to make a realistic version of the picture as the face ages. There is no surprise as to why Face App has gained popularity among young users around the world.

There is a problem though: you need to submit your photo to the app. This means that providing the chosen selfie, FaceApp will have access to your photo at their disposal. That’s why concerns were raised by security experts and data privacy advocates regarding the implication of sending a photo to an app.

One thing that concerns advocate and experts the most is the fact that the company that built and developed the app is from Russia. It is owned by a Russian company named Wireless Labs and has been downloaded by more than 100 million people via Google Play on the Android platform, and by over 50 million people across other platforms including Apple’s iOS.

The Russia issue

Many advocates have cited the human rights record of Russia, as well as the heightened citizen surveillance they have in their country. The fears of advocates and experts are amplified after the privacy terms and conditions for the app reveals that it sneakily includes a clause that would “grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable, nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide, fully-paid, transferable sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, publicly perform and display your User Content and any name, username or likeness provided in connection with your User Content in all media formats and channels now known or later developed, without compensation to you [the user or the owner of the photo].”

The app’s terms of use also grant the developers to publish the photos they gathered in public at their discretion. “When you post or otherwise share User Content on or through our Services, you understand that your User Content and any associated information (such as your [username], location or profile photo) will be visible to the public,” they added.

The polarizing opinions about FaceApp have opened the discussion on how people are carelessly sharing their photos on social media platforms and smartphone apps without a thorough understanding of the implications of such action. In an article published by Wired, they said that what FaceApp is doing is rather common than new.

They said that the same thing is happening when someone uploads a photo on Facebook and Instagram. Instead of demonizing FaceApp and singling it out, the article encourages users to be more vigilant with the data they share across all platforms.

FaceApp clarifies

However, security experts and advocates still press on the idea that FaceApp could be used by the Russian government in its surveillance and technology-versus-people agenda. However, FaceApp is strong in its position that it is protecting the privacy of their users, saying that they “perform[s] most of the photo processing in the cloud. We only upload a photo selected by a user for editing. We never transfer any other images from the phone to the cloud.”

“We might store an uploaded photo in the cloud. The main reason for that is performance and traffic: we want to make sure that the user doesn’t upload the photo repeatedly for every edit operation. Most images are deleted from our servers within 48 hours from the upload date. We don’t sell or share any user data with any third parties,” they added.

They also countered the claims that they can be used as Russia’s trojan horse and said that “even though the core R&D team is located in Russia, the user data is not transferred to Russia.”

Furthermore, they clarified that they don’t require users to log in their app for them to use it and while they ask for device permission to access the phone’s camera and photo roll, they only access those that are selected by the users for editing.

“You can quickly check this with any of network sniffing tools available on the internet,” they said.

About the Author

Al Restar
A consumer tech and cybersecurity journalist who does content marketing while daydreaming about having unlimited coffee for life and getting a pet llama. I also own a cybersecurity blog called Zero Day.

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