Huawei Exec Backtracks: Hongmeng OS Is Not For Smartphones

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When Chinese smartphone giant, Huawei, was caught off-guard by Google’s revocation of its Android license following the ban imposed by Washington against the company, the smartphone maker made people believe that they are ready for such situation, and announced that they are developing an alternative operating system called Hongmeng.

However, in an interview, Liang Hua, an executive from the tech superpower, backtracks and says that Hongmeng was developed not as an alternative for Android but for the development of their IoT products instead.

Liang Hua said at a Friday press conference in Shenzhen that the operating system, which was rumored to be 60% faster than android, was not developed for smartphones and that the company still prefers Android as their “first choice” for a smartphone OS.

“The Hongmeng OS is primarily developed for IoT devices that will reduce latency… In terms of smartphones, we are still using the Android operating system and ecosystem as a “first choice.” We haven’t decided yet if the Hongmeng OS can be developed as a smartphone operating system in the future,” said Liang Hua.

Earlier reports revealed that Huawei has been developing Hongmeng since 2012. The company has been testing the new OS on selected devices under a closed door and closed environment. The source also said that the testing was accelerated for the new operating system to be ready for situations such as the latter.

Nonetheless, it is still unclear whether Hongmeng will be the official name of the OS coming from Huawei. Experts note that even if Huawei can successfully launch its operating system, the company will still be faced with the challenge of establishing an app ecosystem. It would take Huawei a lot of time to build apps that are compatible with the new operating system.

When Huawei was subjected to a witch hunt by the US government for allegedly aiding the Chinese government in its efforts to spy on the country, and as a pivotal player to potentially economically sabotage the country, an executive order was launched against the China-based tech giant that effectively forced U.S. tech companies to sever ties with Huawei.

The ban from Google has brought Huawei’s future into limbo; making it uncertain for users, especially concerning security updates for their Huawei and Honor phones —or the general idea whether their devices will still be able to run altogether. Following the announcement, Huawei assured its users that all phones that were sold ahead of the banning and those that are already in stock would continue receiving updates from Android.

Now, Huawei’s backtrack follows the bilateral meeting between Trump and China’s Xi Jinping in the recently concluded G-20 Meeting held in Tokyo; the American president announced that American companies could already resume in selling their products to Chinese companies.

The two presidents, in a closely watched sit-down with each other, have agreed for a truce and cease-fire over the long-disputed trade wars between the two superpowers.

“U.S. companies can sell their equipment to Huawei. We’re talking about equipment where there’s no great national security problem with it. I said that’s O.K., that we will keep selling that product, these are American companies that make these products,” Donald Trump said after his meeting with the Chinese president. “That’s very complex, by the way. I’ve agreed to allow them to continue to sell that product so that American companies will continue.”

While the relief is what Huawei has been looking forward to from the G-20 meeting today, it seems like it could be a temporary relief as negotiations regarding the matter is bound to continue, and the ad hoc decision of Trump may still be overturned at some point of the negotiations. Nonetheless, it’s time for the Chinese smartphone superpower to breathe better.

Washington officials are reportedly holding meetings on how they will implement the new orders from Trump. However, special attention has to be given on how to deal with Huawei and its presence on the “entity list,” as the relief does not explicitly remove Huawei from the said list.

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