Facebook Live One-Strike Approach Would Ban Offending Streamers On First Offense

Facebook will ban repeat offenders of their community standards in FB Live.Facebook will ban repeat offenders of their community standards in FB Live. Image from Blogtrepreneur | Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Two months following the devastating shooting in Christchurch, Facebook remains in hot water for allegedly failing to take down the shooter’s live video streaming as the shooting happens, but Facebook is doing something about it by introducing a new set of rules that would govern their services.

Starting today, the San Francisco-based tech company will implement the “one-strike” policy for Facebook Live and its other live video streaming platforms. According to Facebook, a user can immediately get banned from using their live video streaming services for one offense for a certain period, such as 30 days. They clarified that this is specifically targeted to those people who violated their “most serious policies.” Facebook did not specify all the rules that would govern the new regulation, but their announcement pointed out to their updated community standards, especially the clause that prohibits spreading terrorist propaganda on the social media platform.

Furthermore, while the focus right now is for terrorism-related violations, the tech giant said that the new policy would soon expand to other topics and issues in the coming weeks. Aside from banning violators from using their live streaming services, Facebook also said that the same offenders would be barred from purchasing ads on the platform.

Facebook’s spokesperson said that under the new policy, the Christchurch shooter wouldn’t have been able to live stream the unfortunate event in the first. However, it is still unclear what the violation of the shooter was within the last 30 days before the shooting occurred.

Two months ago, during the Christchurch shooting, a live video of the incident had been broadcasted on the social media site, and Facebook did not take it down until more than 15 minutes through the video. In their defense, Facebook said that their late response was because no one has reported its existence.

However, Jared Holt, a reporter for Right Wing Watch, said he was alerted to the live stream and reported it immediately during the attack. “I was sent a link to the 8chan post by someone who was scared shortly after it was posted. I followed the Facebook link shared in the post. It was mid-attack, and it was horrifying. I reported it,” Holt tweeted. “Either Facebook is lying, or their system wasn’t functioning properly.”

“I definitely remember reporting this, but there’s no record of it on Facebook. It’s very frustrating,” Holt said. “I don’t know that I believe Facebook would lie about this, especially given the fact law enforcement is likely asking them for the info, but I’m so confused as to why the system appears not to have processed my flag.”

With the new policy, a single report will have had stopped the shooter from live streaming.

FACEBOOK FACES LAWSUIT

The slow response of Facebook on the Christchurch live stream incident, the company has faced public scrutiny and law suits. Facebook may be facing court soon for their failure to control the spread of the violent live broadcast of New Zealand’s Christchurch mosque shooting as a French Muslim group announced their plans to take the two social media platforms to court.

According to Abdallah Zekri, president of the CFCM’s Islamophobia monitoring unit, the organization had launched a formal legal complaint against Facebook and Youtube in France in March.

The council said it was suing the French branches of the two companies for “broadcasting a message with violent content abetting terrorism, or of a nature likely to seriously violate human dignity and liable to be seen by a minor,” according to the complaint. In France, such acts can be punished by three years’ imprisonment and €75,000 (£64,000) fine.

“CHRISTCHURCH CALL”

The announcement of the new policies being implemented by Facebook comes ahead of a move by New Zealand and France to urge tech companies and nations to work together to mitigate the growing popularity of extremist contents online. The non-binding agreement, called the Christchurch Call, is expected to be made known this week at a meeting of digital stakeholders for the Group of Seven Nations.

“I’ve spoken to Mark Zuckerberg directly twice now, and actually we’ve had good ongoing communication with Facebook,” New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour Monday. “The last time I spoke to him a matter of days ago, he did give Facebook’s support to this call to action.”

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