San Francisco Earthquake Hits at 5:33AM with Magnitude 4.0

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San Francisco Earthquake Today

San Francisco Bay area had two small earthquakes early this morning leaving no damage or injury. The U.S. Geological Survey reported a magnitude-2.9 quake rattled at 5:33 a.m. about eight miles northeast of San Francisco in the city of El Cerrito. Then followed eight seconds later by a magnitude-4.0 earthquake a quarter-mile northeast. Both earthquakes had a depth of about 5 1/2 miles.

The shaking from the San Francisco earthquake was felt within a 60-mile radius, from Santa Rosa in the north to Santa Cruz in the south. The epicenter was a mile from East Richmond Heights, two miles from Richmond, four miles from Berkeley and 13 miles from San Francisco City Hall.

BART temporarily held back service to inspect the track but the train service quickly resumed.

A 2.0 magnitude aftershock was recorded in El Cerrito about an half an hour after the first two earthquakes in San Francisco.

People took to Twitter to sound off about feeling the shake and rattle from the San Francisco earthquake.

“Big San Francisco earthquake just now …” Tom Kazarian

“Nothing like a San Francisco #earthquake to wake you up at 5:30 in the morning. Good morning!” Iris Atalay

“That was a pretty strong jolt! Good Morning San Francisco! #earthquake” Steven B

“My first San Francisco earthquake. *sniff*” Jimmy Cuadra

“Walls were shaking this morning which sadly jolted me from a deep sleep at 5:30 am in San Francisco: #earthquake”

In the past 10 days, there have been two earthquakes with magnitudes of 3.0 and greater near the San Francisco Bay area.

USGS seismologist David Schwartz told KGO-TV on Monday, “We know that the Hayward Fault is the really important fault in the Bay Area. These earthquakes, these 4’s, are just an indication of ongoing activity, ongoing stress on the fault. They do nothing to relieve the likelihood of something larger happening.”

There is a 62 percent likelihood that the San Francisco Bay area will see a large quake by the year 2032, according to the 2003 report from USGS.

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